The Heart of a Woman

Nav:Home > Biographies & Memoirs > Ethnic & National > The Heart of a Woman

Press:Bantam Bantam; 1 edition (June 1, 1997)
Publication Date:1997-06-01
ISBN:9780553380095
Author Name:Maya Angelou
Pages:336
Language:English

Content

This engaging book chronicles the changes in Maya Angelou's life as she enters the hub of activity that is New York.  There, at the Harlem Writers Guild, sherededicates herself to writing, and finds love at an unexpected moment. 
Reflecting on her many roles--from northern coordinator of Martin Luther King's history-making quest to mother of a rebellious teenage son--Angelou eloquently speaks to an awareness of the heart within us all.

Review

"Remarkable... 
a great lady moving right on  through a great memoir." -- Kirkus  ReviewsFrom the Paperback edition.

From the Publisher

This engaging book chronicles the changes in Maya Angelou's life as she enters the hub of activity that is New York. 
There, at the Harlem Writers Guild, she rededicates herself to writing, and finds love at an unexpected moment.
Reflecting on her many roles--from northern coordinator of Martin Luther King's history-making quest to mother of a rebellious teenage son--Angelou eloquently speaks to an awareness of the heart within us all.

From the Inside Flap

This engaging book chronicles the changes in Maya Angelou's life as she enters the hub of activity that is New York.  There, at the Harlem Writers Guild, sherededicates herself to writing, and finds love at an unexpected moment. 
Reflecting on her many roles--from northern coordinator of Martin Luther King's history-making quest to mother of a rebellious teenage son--Angelou eloquently speaks to an awareness of the heart within us all.

From the Back Cover

"I know that not since the days of my childhood, when people in books were more real than the people one saw every day, have I found myself SO moved."-- James Baldwin"Full of laughter and tears, love and hate, failures and triumphs, and above all, understanding."-- John O. 
Killens"Gather Together in My Name"Gather Together in My Name is part of a select body of literature that includes The Autobiography of Malcolm X, Claude Brown's Manchild in the Promised land, and Ernest J.
Gaines's The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.
Maya Angelou regards the world and herself with intelligence and wit; she records the events of her life with style and grace."-- William McPherson, The Washington Post Book World"Here the 'caged bird' soars, and sings in a voice as rich and funny, passionate and mellow as any writer I know."-- Shana Alexander

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Poet, writer, performer, teacher and director Maya Angelou was raised in Stamps, Arkansas, and then went to San Francisco. 
In addition to her bestselling autobiographies, beginning with I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, she has also written five poetry collections, including I Shall Not Be Moved and Shaker, Why Don't You Sing?, as well as the celebrated poem "On the Pulse of Morning," which she read at the inauguration of President William Jefferson Clinton.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

The Harlem Writer's Guild was meeting at John's house, and my palms were sweating and my tongue was thick.  The loosely formed organization, without  dues or membership cards, had one strict rule: any invited guest could sit in  for three meetings, but thereafter, the visitor had to read from his or her  work in progress.  My time had come. 
Sara Wright and Sylvester Leeks  stood in a corner talking softly.  John Clarke was staring at titles in the  bookcase.  Mary Delaney and Millie Jordan were giving their coats to Grace  and exchanging greetings.  The other writers were already seated around the  living room in a semicircle.
John Killens walked past me, touching my  shoulder, took his seat and called the meeting to order.
"O.K.,  everybody.  Let's start." Chairs scraped the floor and the sounds  reverberated in my armpits.  "As you know, our newest member, our California  singer, is going to read from her new play.  What's the title,  Maya?" "One Love, One Life."  My usually deep voice leaked out  high-pitched and weak.
A writer asked how many acts the play had.  I  answered again in the piping voice, "So far only one." Everyone  laughed; they thought I was making a joke.
"If everyone is ready, we  can begin." John picked up his note pad.  There was a loud rustling as the  writers prepared to take notes.
I read the character and set  description despite the sudden perversity of my body.  The blood pounded in  my ears but not enough to drown the skinny sound of my voice.  My hands shook  so that I had to lay the pages in my lap, but that was not a good solution  due to the tricks my knees were playing.  They lifted voluntarily, pulling my  heels off the floor and then trembled like disturbed Jello.  Before I  launched into the play's action, I looked around at the writers expecting but  hoping not to see their amusement at my predicament.  Their faces were  studiously blank.  Within a year, I was to learn that each had a horror story  about a first reading at the Harlem Writers Guild.
Time wrapped itself  around every word, slowing me.  I couldn't force myself to read faster.
The  pages seemed to be multiplying even as I was trying to reduce them.  The play  was dull, the characters, unreal, and the dialogue was taken entirely off the  back of a Campbell's soup can.  I knew this was my first and last time at the  Guild.  Even if I hadn't the grace to withdraw voluntarily, I was certain the  members had a method of separating the wheat from the chaff.
"The End."  At last.
The members laid their notes down beside their chairs  and a few got up to use the toilets.  No one spoke.  Even as I read I knew  the drama was bad, but maybe someone would have lied a little.
The  room filled.  Only the whispering of papers shifting told me that the jury  was ready.
John Henrik Clarke, a taut little man from the South,  cleared his throat.  If he was to be the first critic, I knew I would receive  the worst sentence.  John Clarke was famous in the group for his keen  intelligence and bitter wit.  He had supposedly once told the FBI that they  were wrong to think that he would sell out his home state of Georgia; he added that he would give it away, and if he found no takers he would even pay  someone to take it.
"One Life.  One Love?"  His voice was a  rasp  of disbelief.  "I found no life and very little love in the play from the  opening of the act to its unfortunate end." Using superhuman power, I  kept my mouth closed and my eyes on my yellow pad.
He continued, his  voice lifting.  "In 1879, on a March evening, Alexander Graham Bell  successfully completed his attempts to send the human voice through a little  wire.  The following morning  some frustrated playwright, unwilling to build  the necessary construction plot, began his play with a phone call." A  general deprecating murmur floated in the air.
"Aw, John" and "Don't  be so mean" and "Ooo Johnnn, you ought to be ashamed."  Their moans were facetious, mere accompaniment to their relish.
Grace invited everyone  to drinks, and the crowd rose and started milling around, while I stayed in  my chair.
Grace called to me.  "Come on, Maya.  Have a drink.
You  need it."  I grinned and knew movement was out of the question.
Killens came over.  "Good thing you stayed.  You got some very important criticism." He, too, could slide to hell straddling knotted greasy rope.   "Don't just sit there.  If they think you're too sensitive, you won't get  such valuable criticism the next time you read." The next time? He  wasn't as bright as he looked.  I would never see those snotty bastards as  long as I stayed black and their asses pointed toward the ground.  I put a  nasty-sweet smile on my face and nodded.
"That's right, Maya Angelou,  show them you can take anything they can dish out.  Let me tell you  something." He started to sit down beside me, but mercifully another writer  called him away.
I measured the steps from my chair to the door.
I  could make it in ten strides.
"Maya, you've got a story to  tell." I looked up into John Clarke's solemn face.
"I think I  can speak for the Harlem Writer's Guild.  We're glad to have you.  John  Killens came back from California talking about your talent.  Well, in this  group we remind each other that talent is not enough.  You've got to work.   Write each sentence over and over again, until it seems you've used every  combination possible, then write it again.  Publishers don't care much for  white writers." He coughed or laughed.  "You can imagine what they think about black ones.  Come on.  Let's get a drink." I got up and followed him without a first thought.

From AudioFile

What a woman! What a heart! African-American poet/activist Maya Angelou continues to lead a significant, eventful life -- some early episodes of which she reveals in this fascinating memoir. 
It focuses on her relationships with men, especially with her fatherless son, during the tumultuous '60's.
Writing with a lyric simplicity, she's often frank, but rarely candid.
As performer, she narrates with the same distinctive, measured dignity that has become familiar from her many televised poetry readings.
The abridgment is a bit too brief for those wanting to hear more about Godfrey Cambridge, James Baldwin and her other pals.
But it does serve to highlight, namely the development of her touching relationship with her son as he entered manhood and independence.
Y.R.
(c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Tags

Biographies & Memoirs,Ethnic & National,African-American & Black,Arts & Literature,Authors,Specific Groups,Women



 PDF Download And Online Read: The Heart of a Woman



Comment

 
 

Comment List (Total:18)

  •     This book is profoundly inspiring. I've never written a review before but I simply had to here. This book is for everyone, whether male or female, young or old, black or white. I love her way with words and that she's so brutally honest, especially the way she describes about being a woman. I am left with wanting more and I'm buying another ebook now..
  •     After reading this book for the third time, I still find it a wonderful book that provides intimate details of an exciting time in Maya' s life. She generously shares her struggles and triumphs in such rich and down to earth discourses of her adventurous life. I thoroughly enjoyed being reminded about many historically significant events and Maya' s role in them, which she shares with a uniquely stylish flair.
  •     This biography by Maya Angelou is a wonderfully written account of another piece of her intriguing life. It's a mixture of her growth and understanding of what it means to be a Black American in Africa married to an African Freedom Fighter, and parenting her teenage son through all. I now have to continue on with her next biography!
  •     This is an amazing book, its taught me that I should do something to change things, if I can and to except and embrace the things that I can't change.I would recommend this book.
  •     Have not read, as it was a gift for my daughter.
  •     Maya Angelou has such a way with words where you feel as though she is telling her story to you and only you. I really enjoyed reading this book.
  •     Love it!
  •     Maya Angelou's poetic wisdom about raising her son and navigating marriage were insightful and fascinating.
  •     I was glad to have this for my Maya Angelou collection.
  •     OK
  •     I didn't want it to end and when it did I immediately sobbed. Am on a quest to read everything she's ever written.
  •     I just love all Maya Angelou work
  •     Fascinating. Loved learning about this period in Maya Angelou's life.
  •     Remarkable and amazing! Maya Angelou is the epitome of a "Phenomenal Woman. Every women and girl should read her story.
  •     Her biography was an interesting read, but I somehow felt like I was reading about a totally different person.., but it offered a good insight into Ms. Angelou's life. Her views confuse me and her life decisions seem without serious thought. I don't believe I would be interested in reading any more of her books.
  •     As always Maya never disappoint. Being a black women I really relate to her stories and life's ups and downs. I've always had a love and appreciate Maya's boldness and willingness so share her life's lessons to help us( younger generations) not to feel alone when life gets difficult seems to be overwhelming. She give me hope in those times.
  •     a great book by a favorite author
  •     Very engrossing story. I loved it that it was all true. I remembered how stupid I felt when at the age of ten when I didn't know the Facts of Life!
 

Legal Theory & Systems,Cooking Methods,Physics,Dentistry,Other Team Sports,Infantil y juvenil,Cars, Trains & Things That Go,Christian Denominations & Sects Book,。 FreeBook 

FreeBook @ 2018