John Barleycorn Must Die: The War Against Drink in Arkansas

Nav:Home > Cookbooks, Food & Wine > Cooking Education & Reference > John Barleycorn Must Die: The War Against Drink in Arkansas

Press:University of Arkansas Press University of Arkansas Press (March 1, 2005)
Publication Date:2005-03-15
ISBN:9781557287878
Author Name:Ben F., III Johnson
Pages:99
Language:English

Content

As the traditional British folk song that the rock group Traffic made famous in the 1970s and that lends its name to this book’s title demonstrates, the battle against John Barleycorn was a losing one: “And little Sir John and the nut-brown bowl / Proved the strongest man at last.” Ben Johnson’s sweeping, highly readable, and extensively illustrated “spirited” overview of Arkansas’s efforts to regulate and halt the consumption of alcohol reveals much about the texture of life and politics in the state—and country—as Arkansas grappled with strong opinions on both sides. 
After early attempts to keep drink from the American Indians during the colonial period, temperance groups’ efforts switched to antebellum towns and middle-class citizens.
After the Civil War new federal taxes on whiskey production led to violence between revenue agents and moonshiners, and the state joined the growing national movement against saloons that culminated in 1915 when the legislature approved a measure to halt the sale, manufacture, and distribution of alcohol—including that of Arkansas’s substantial wine industry.
The state supported national prohibition, but people became disillusioned with the widespread violations of the law.
However, the state didn’t repeal its own prohibition law until a fiscal crisis in 1935 required it in order to raise revenue.
The new law only authorized retail liquor stores, not the return of taverns or bars.
A final effort to restore laws against John Barleycorn in 1950 was rebuffed by voters.
Still, there are a number of counties in Arkansas that remain dry and disputes over the granting of private club licenses continue to make news.

From the Inside Flap

As the traditional British folk song that the rock group Traffic made famous in the 1970s and that lends its name to this book s title demonstrates, the battle against John Barleycorn was a losing one: And little Sir John and the nut-brown bowl / Proved the strongest man at last. 
Ben Johnson s sweeping, highly readable, and extensively illustrated spirited overview of Arkansas s efforts to regulate and halt the consumption of alcohol reveals much about the texture of life and politics in the stateand countryas Arkansas grappled with strong opinions on both sides.
After early attempts to keep drink from the American Indians during the colonial period, temperance groups efforts switched to antebellum towns and middle-class citizens.
After the Civil War new federal taxes on whiskey production led to violence between revenue agents and moonshiners, and the state joined the growing national movement against saloons that culminated in 1915 when the legislature approved a measure to halt the sale, manufacture, and distribution of alcoholincluding that of Arkansas s substantial wine industry.
The state supported national prohibition, but people became disillusioned with the widespread violations of the law.
However, the state didn t repeal its own prohibition law until a fiscal crisis in 1935 required it in order to raise revenue.
The new law only authorized retail liquor stores, not the return of taverns or bars.
A final effort to restore laws against John Barleycorn in 1950 was rebuffed by voters.
Still, there are a number of counties in Arkansas that remain dry and disputes over the granting of private club licenses continue to make news."

About the Author

Ben Johnson III is an associate professor of history at Southern Arkansas University. 
He is the author of Arkansas in Modern America: 1930-1999 (Arkansas) and Fierce Solitude: A Life of John Gould Fletcher (Arkansas).
The exhibit on which this book is based won an Award of Merit from the American Association for State and Local History (2004): “This is an exhibit worthy of being a national model for others to emulate.

Tags

Cookbooks, Food & Wine,Cooking Education & Reference,History,Beverages & Wine,Wine & Spirits,Humor & Entertainment,Pop Culture,General



 PDF Download And Online Read: John Barleycorn Must Die: The War Against Drink in Arkansas



Comment

 
 

Comment List (Total:1)

  •     John Barleycorn Must Die: The War Against Drink In Arkansas by Ben Johnson III (Associate Professor of History, Southern Arkansas University) begins with the early attempts to keep alcohol from the Native Americans during Arkansas' colonial period. Then temperance groups focused on outlawing alcohol in the antebellum communities of Arkansas. After the Civil War new federal taxes on whiskey production in Arkansas led to violence between revenue agents and moonshiners. The state joined the growing national movement against saloons the culminated in 1915 when the legislature approved a measure to health the sale, manufacture, and distribution of alcohol (which prohibition included the then thriving wine industry in Arkansas). The state supported national prohibition, but the people became disillusioned with the widespread violations of the law. But the state waited to repeal its own prohibition law until compelled to do so by a fiscal crisis in 1935 that required it to raise revenue. Even then, the new law only authorized retail liquor stores, and not the return of taverns or bars. A final effort to restore prohibition in 1950 was rebuffed by voters, but there are still 43 counties in Arkansas remain dry, and only 32 are wet -- with disputes over the granting of private club licenses continuing to be a lively social and political concern throughout the state. Enhanced with 50 photographs and an index, John Barleycorn Must Die is a work of considerable scholarship and an impressive contribution to both American History and Arkansas State History library reference collections.

Relation Books

 

Legal Theory & Systems,Cooking Methods,Physics,Dentistry,Other Team Sports,Infantil y juvenil,Cars, Trains & Things That Go,Christian Denominations & Sects Book,。 FreeBook 

FreeBook @ 2018