Blender Baby Food: Over 175 Recipes for Healthy Homemade Meals

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Press: Robert Rose; 2 edition (March 10, 2011)
Publication Date:2011-3
ISBN:9780778802624
Author Name:Young, Nicole
Pages:240
Language:English

Content

Making nutritious, homemade baby food has never been so easy. 
This second edition (9780778802624) replaces the first edition (9780778801184).
Like the first edition, this new edition of Blender Baby Food guides readers through the process of making their your own baby food.
The blender has proven to be an ideal way to offer new flavors in a baby-friendly texture.
Even when a child begins to eat table food, there is always an occasion for a fruit smoothie or a nutritious blended dip.
There are three great reasons for parents to make their own baby food: 1) The ingredients are all hand selected, assuring healthy and wholesome meals 2) Parents can easily tailor the texture to their baby's preferences 3) It will help shape a baby's tastes so he or she can appreciate fresh foods This new edition features 25 new recipes, information on the basics of feeding babies, color photos and a nutritional analysis for each recipe.
The delicious and easy-to-prepare recipes are categorized according to age, making it easy and convenient to create meals that match a baby's progress and development, from six months through to twelve months and older.
The outstanding variety of flavors and textures includes: Cherried peaches Guacamole for beginners Squash and pepper risotto Lentil and rice pilaf Vegetable paella Cheesy beef casserole Over-the-top applesauce Orange banana smoothie The book also includes meal plans, helpful tips and techniques and even advice on storing and freezing baby food.
Using this comprehensive cookbook, parents will quickly discover that giving their baby the best nutritional advantage is its own reward.

About the Author

Nicole Young is an experienced and highly respected recipe developer and food stylist who teaches seminars and classes on making baby food. 
The mother of two young children, she lives in Toronto, Ontario.
This is her third cookbook.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Preface  A month before I gave birth to my first child, I attended a birthday party for a friend's son. 
I observed the "veteran" parents escorting their toddlers to the table at mealtime and stared in utter amazement at my friend's son, who sat proudly in his high chair and proceeded to eat his first birthday meal of blanched broccoli and green beans, strips of red peppers and carrots, while the neighboring children pushed away everything but fish crackers.
What had my friend done to produce this veggie- and hummus-loving pita eater? As I watched him eat his body weight in produce, I heard his mother's words: "I made all his food from scratch." I was sold.
Over the past five years, I have taught hundreds of classes to parents and caregivers about the merits of preparing their own food for babies.
We discuss the issues of variety, quality, ability to graduate textures and cost effectiveness.
I demonstrate the simplicity of preparing a variety of purees, even for sleep-deprived parents whose last wish is have an extra task added to their baby-dominated lives.
All of these details are included in Nadine's comprehensive introduction.
While it has been many years since I had to make my own purees, the benefits are undeniable.
I have two healthy eaters, who still enjoy treats but don't turn their noses up at a platter of fresh veggies.
I am fortunate.
More than anything, I want this book to inspire you to give making your own baby food a try.
May you and your child have many happy memories of the food from these pages...

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Preface    A month before I gave birth to my first child, I attended a birthday party for a friend's son. 
I observed the "veteran" parents escorting their toddlers to the table at mealtime and stared in utter amazement at my friend's son, who sat proudly in his high chair and proceeded to eat his first birthday meal of blanched broccoli and green beans, strips of red peppers and carrots, while the neighboring children pushed away everything but fish crackers.
What had my friend done to produce this veggie- and hummus-loving pita eater? As I watched him eat his body weight in produce, I heard his mother's words: "I made all his food from scratch." I was sold.
Over the past five years, I have taught hundreds of classes to parents and caregivers about the merits of preparing their own food for babies.
We discuss the issues of variety, quality, ability to graduate textures and cost effectiveness.
I demonstrate the simplicity of preparing a variety of purees, even for sleep-deprived parents whose last wish is have an extra task added to their baby-dominated lives.
All of these details are included in Nadine's comprehensive introduction.
While it has been many years since I had to make my own purees, the benefits are undeniable.
I have two healthy eaters, who still enjoy treats but don't turn their noses up at a platter of fresh veggies.
I am fortunate.
More than anything, I want this book to inspire you to give making your own baby food a try.
May you and your child have many happy memories of the food from these pages...


--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Tags

Cookbooks, Food & Wine,Kitchen Appliances,Blenders,Parenting & Relationships,Parenting,Early Childhood,Cooking Methods



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Comment

 
 

Comment List (Total:12)

  •     I bought this thinking that I had no idea how to puree food for my first child but also wanting to be a health nut and only feed her organic while also saving money not buying the...
  •     I had the first version of this and loved the book enough to buy this version for a friend. Fresh baby food is really easy to make, and its a whole lot cheaper than buying food at...
  •     Good for babies a little older going from puree foods to a little thicker. Loved the combination recipes.
  •     We did not use this book much for making baby purees. I had another book I used that seemed to have simpler recipes.
  •     This book is beyond basic. I cook all the time and I know that you should add water and pull seeds from various fruits. I could of saved my money other than buying this.
  •     Gift for my daughter who has twins
  •     I didn't get this book till my baby was over 10 months old, so I'm not sure what I'm about to say will apply to younger babies just starting on solids.I love this book! My baby had been eating table food for a while, but she was stuck in a bit of a rut with pretty much the same foods over and over, in about a 5-day cycle: chicken stew, mac-n-cheese, rice and gravy, spaghetti with meat sauce, etc., with whatever boring steamed veggies on the side.I live in South Louisiana, where we have delicious, flavorful, spicy cuisine. However, 1) it often contains ingredients she shouldn't have yet, such as shrimp, and 2) I'm afraid it might be too spicy for her! I didn't know how to provide the blandness of what baby can tolerate, while not deadening her taste buds to new flavors as she grows up (or making her into a picky eater).This book really kicked up both the main and side dishes for her. The dishes are bland enough for young-uns to tolerate, but flavorful enough to excite their taste buds and explore new flavors. Also, they are probably more nutritious than what we'd been feeding her.The book has several sections: a 6-month-and-up, a 7-month-and-up, an 8-month-and-up, a 9-and-up, and a 12-and-up chapter. There are brief blurbs about what to introduce at each stage, and each section has a grid showing a sample meal plan. It's not extremely thorough, but it is helpful and provides a simple guideline.Here are some sample recipes:6 months and up:--mostly plain fruits and veggies, with good tips on how to prepare them7 months and up:--green rice (rice with fresh greens--very nice!)--squash and pepper risotto--vegetable paella8 months and up:--avocado chicken--chicken with pumpkin--chicken divine9 months and up:--fruity breakfast rice (yum!)--broccoli and cauliflower gratin12 months and up:--fruity frosty shake--nutty choco monkey--nutty wafflesAll the recipes are quite easy to make, believe me. And so delicious! The recipes recommend good ingredients, too, such as brown rice, lots of fruit and veggies, and low-sodium stock. Most of the ingredients are relatively easy to find at the grocery store, and easily substituted if you're on a budget.The baby really likes the broccoli/cauliflower gratin, the spinach and tomatoes with ricotta, and the chicken tropical (chicken with mangoes). This book really gets baby interested in fruits and veggies, with its interesting, flavorful preparations.Obviously, I cannot speak for parents of babies with severe food allergies. I also cannot speak for the younger babies, since I waited so long to get this book. All I can tell you is, a) delicious, b) easy to prepare, c) my baby loves the recipes.
  •     Nice book! Has great recipes and information. I wish I had used it more though. I didn't end up needing it or using it as much as I hoped.
  •     easy and yummy.
  •     This book makes making your own baby food so easy. The recipes are great and my baby loves the food. I like that I know what he's eating.
  •     This is a great book for those who want to control the content and quality of the food their baby eats and save money in the process. Although some of the "recipes" seem awfully self-evident (Cook peas. Put in blender with water. Blend.), what this book does well is give you an idea what foods to offer when. I also liked that this book gave sample menus, so I'd know how much food to offer. The absolute best thing about this book, however, is the confidence it gave me to move beyond the standard peas, squash, and sweet potatoes. My 7 month old loves avocado, cauliflower, lima beans, and other foods that he'd never get from Gerber. Cost wise, we did the math. Two Gerber cups of food cost 80 cents at our local Kroger. That works out to $1.83/pound. So, any food that costs less than that whole is cheaper when you make your own food, especially since you add water most of the time. I also love that I control the texture. My son is an adventurous eater, and likes things much thicker and chunkier than you'd get in a container of Gerber. Lastly, I especially liked this book because we don't eat organic, we aren't into soy products, we just want to feed our son the best possible diet on our limited budget. This book doesn't give you the guilt trip about how if you feed your kid a non-organic broccoli floret they're going to grow up stupid, if they grow up at all. I read some of the other baby food books out there, and many of the others assume that you are making your own baby food because you are one of those organic, whole foods evangelists. This book just gives you the recipes without the rhetoric.On the negative side, and the reason that I gave this book 4 stars instead of 5, is that there is no discussion of nitrates. For example, there are recipes for carrots, spinach, kohlrabi, and other very high nitrate foods in the book. Buying organic will NOT result in fewer nitrates because it depends on the region of the US and the soil in the specific plot where the food is grown. You are safer feeding Gerber carrots and spinach, because at the very least Gerber screens for nitrate levels and you cannot. We are simply holding off feeding these foods until our son is old enough to handle the nitrates, around 12 months old. (My husband does public health research for the State, and did research on nitrates in foods for work).Lastly, if you are even thinking about making your own baby food, give it a try. My mother raised three daughters and bought very little baby food, and I thought I'd give it a try, but didn't expect to keep it up since I work 50 hours a week. It's been surprisingly easy. We just keep the cubes in the freezer, and thaw as needed. I make extra veggies at supper to blend, so it's not extra work. I think that almost anyone could do this. Also, get a little food mill. Then, when the baby is old enough, you can just grind up a little of whatever the family is eating for supper. My mom even used to take her little food mill out to eat.
  •     The book is very nicely put together to give ideas for moms and very useful easy to follow directions.. for creating recipes for baby beginning to eat.
 

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