Windows 98 in a Nutshell: A Desktop Quick Reference (In a Nutshell (O'Reilly))

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Press:O'Reilly Media, Inc. O'Reilly Media; 2nd edition (September 5, 1999)
Publication Date:1999-08-26
ISBN:9781565924864
Author Name:Tim O'Reilly,Troy Mott,Walter Glenn
Pages:642
Language:English
Edition:2nd Edition

Content

Windows 98 in a Nutshell is a comprehensive, compact reference that systematically unveils what serious users of Windows 98 will find interesting and useful. 
Little known details of the operating system, utility programs, and configuration settings are all captured in a consistent reference format.Based on the bestselling "In a Nutshell" approach, this book contains more information about using Windows 98 than any other book on the market.
Guaranteed.
Windows 98 in a Nutshell was coauthored by Tim O'Reilly, the publisher whose books have revolutionized computer book publishing with their commonsense approach, depth of detail, and focus on practical information that you can really use.
If you can't remember which option on a dialog box controls a function, or if you just want to have a better handle on what's available in Windows 98 and Windows 98 Second Edition, this is the book you need.It contains:Detailed information on almost every command and utility available with Windows 98, including Start Menu accessories, DOS commands, hidden system administration utilities such as the Registry Editor, Policy Editor, and TweakUI, as well as new utilities in Windows 98Detailed advice and documentation on system configuration via the Control Panel, system startup files, and the RegistryA detailed treatment of Internet configuration and access via Dial-Up NetworkingHundreds of tips, gotchas, and clever ways to do familiar and not-so-familiar tasksA focus on ways to integrate the command line into your work with Windows 98Pointers to dozens of useful online sites that contain additional informationInformation on how to use Win98's new Web integration features to build custom "Web applications" within folders or on your desktopDetailed information on Windows Script Host (WSH), the feature that lets you use VBScript or other scripting languages to automate common tasksThis book follows the commonsense O'Reilly approach, cutting through the hype and giving practical details you can use every day.
Any user who wants to make the most of Windows 98 and Windows 98 Second Edition will love this book.

Review

'Highly recommended for anyone who wants to get the best out of Windows 98. 
It has already helped me to resolve a few problems as well as discover many new features.
I look forward to the Windows Millienium edition.
' - Mike Mallett, Cvu, February 2001

About the Author

Tim O'Reilly is the founder and CEO of O'Reilly & Associates, thought by many to be the best computer book publisher in the world. 
O'Reilly also publishes online through the O'Reilly Network (www.oreillynet.com) and hosts conferences on technology topics.
Tim is an activist for open source and open standards, and an opponent of software patents and other incursions of new intellectual property laws into the public domain.
Tim's long term vision for his company is to help change the world by capturing and transmitting the knowledge of innovators.

Tags

Textbooks,Computer Science,Operating Systems,Computers & Technology,Operating Systems,Windows,Windows Desktop,Software,Microsoft



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Comment

 
 

Comment List (Total:8)

  •     The name implies a book for users of all skill levels. Not so. Grab a Dummies book instead and save some cash.
  •     I am doing a review for my User Group and have to completely concur with with the previous two reviewers. A uniquely sensible and empowering book, but still,it is on this side of perfection.I came to this book with five W98 problems, only one was resolved. I do not find it a "Quick Desk Reference" since I struggled to locate the nuggets that were on the edge of my memory. I would like to see this on a CD where the Find tool could be used. And, hyperlinks are the way to go.My guess as to why this book dazzles is that the editors worked hard to make the Boss look good; lots of clean sentences, only a few murky ones.
  •     ...it's that simple. This book is a must have for anyone running win98. I have a number of good books on the OS, but none so portable and so crammed full of info I need as this. It is not unlikely, that if you don't already own a win98 book and you buy this one, you will never have to buy another book on the subject.
  •     If you are looking to learn about Win 98 buy ANY other book. This is a complete waste of time in my opinion.
  •     I must confess that I would not ordinarily think of buying a windows nutshell book because I foolishly thought that I already knew a fair bit about Windows 9x and NT for that matter. However, after browsing through W98Nut in a Border Books, I discovered that this book thoroughly covered many aspect of Win9x in a very concise and readable fashion: networking, boot process, all (and I mean all) miscellaneous and utility programs.Each aspect is covered very nicely - syntax, command options, the effects of the choices (*very important*) and something that I found neat...often there are URLs pointing to a Web reference for a piece of shareware or freeware that either replaces the Windows functionality or supplants it with a better idea.This is the type of book that I call a "commuter book" because you are unlikely to read it cover to cover at one sitting, but more likely to pick it up every spare moment and just cruise through it looking for a gem (and there are many tidbits).In my case, I was on the commuter train thinking about how to automate an FTP file upload from a customer's machine to a Unix server on their network and I looked up the DOS mode ftp program and discovered the syntax to conduct an unattended ftp session! Marvelous.I think if you run Windows 9x you have to have this reference book - forget all the other books that are phone book size (with a CD full of useless stuff that is out of date anyway) and get this compact and chock a block full guide.(I already own Unix in a Nutshell, but I had bought that when I knew little about Unix - now I realize that you need these books more when you THINK you know what you are doing!).
  •     This book is very efficiently organized and it contains lots of useful information about excellent accessory programs that most people have never heard of. It helped me configure Windows to the point that I really like it now. It is weak on registry information, so you have to buy another book if you want to know a lot about that. Definitely worth the money anyway!
  •     I must confess that I would not ordinarily think of buying a windows nutshell book because I foolishly thought that I already knew a fair bit about Windows 9x and NT for that matter. However, after browsing through W98Nut in a Border Books, I discovered that this book thoroughly covered many aspect of Win9x in a very concise and readable fashion: networking, boot process, all (and I mean all) miscellaneous and utility programs.Each aspect is covered very nicely - syntax, command options, the effects of the choices (*very important*) and something that I found neat...often there are URLs pointed to a Web reference for a piece of shareware or freeware that either replaces the Windows functionality or supplants it with a better idea.This is the type of book that I call a "commuter book" because you are unlikely to read it cover to cover at one sitting, but more likely to pick it up every spare moment and just cruise through it looking for a gem (and there are many tidbits).In my case, I was on the commuter train thinking about how to automate an FTP file upload from a customer's machine to a Unix server on their network and I looked up the DOS mode ftp program and discovered the syntax to conduct an unattended ftp session! Marvelous.I think if you run Windows 9x you have to have this reference book - forget all the other books that are phone book size (with a CD full of useless stuff that is out of date anyway) and get this compact and chock a block full guide.(I already own Unix in a Nutshell, but I had bought that when I knew little about Unix - now I realize that you need these books more when you THINK you know what you are doing!).
  •     From the moment I opened Windows 98 in a Nutshell, I was in love. This is the way a book should be written. Every word counts. There is no wading through unimportant information. Why aren't all technical books written like this? I cannot say enough! Thank you.I bought the book because of its title, and because it was not as thick as all the rest, and because it didn't have a thousand pictures of windows and screens inside. Whatever made me reach for it, I was very fortunate. Thanks again.

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